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This tag is associated with 5 posts

100 Free Copies of My New eBook: Thirteen Short Chapters on Remote Sensing

= offer now closed = book now for sale in Amazon and as an iBook =  thanks everyone for downloading = if you liked it, please “share” = I’m giving away 100 copies of my new (self-published) eBook, “Thirteen Short Chapters on Remote Sensing”.  It’s on a first-come-first-served basis, and the offer only lasts for today, … Continue reading

Origami Carbon Cycle Infographic

OK, strictly speaking it’s not origami, since there are no folds, but here is a visualisation of the global carbon cycle using a paper cut-outs motif.   Forests and the carbon cycle are strongly linked since they do most of the photosynthesis that takes carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.  They also respire, and their … Continue reading

Why One Branch Size Dominates Radar Backscatter

Warning: technical post for geeky radar folks! There is a common rule of thumb that I have often seen presented that states that the radar backscatter from a forest canopy mostly originates from scattering elements that are similar in size to the wavelength being used.   Sometimes this is explained through attenuation effects of a full-cover … Continue reading

Further comment on “Radar backscatter is not a ‘direct measure’ of forest biomass”

As a group of scientists at the universities of Edinburgh and Maryland, and the FAO UN-REDD Programme, we’ve just published a short piece in Nature Climate Change magazine entitled “Radar backscatter is not a ‘direct measure’ of forest biomass”. The focus of this correspondance is “to contest the use of the term ‘direct measurement’ to … Continue reading

Do we really understand the backscatter-biomass curve?

To misquote Muhammad Ali:  Anyone who views the world the same at forty five as he did at thirty has wasted fifteen years of his life. When I was thirty I used to explain the radar backscatter-biomass curve like this: When radar backscatter is plotted against forest above ground biomass[1], there is a good positive … Continue reading

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